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The Muslims I Know

The events of 9/11 have created much interest in Islam and Muslims. Mainstream media have responded to this demand for information with sweeping generalizations and easy stereotypes. America’s small community of Muslims longs to be a part of that discourse. This documentary gives them a chance to be heard and understood through dialogue with non-Muslim Americans.

If you yahoo the words “moderate Muslim” today you will get more than 8 million hits on the internet. This interest is the result of a post-9/11 Western world trying to make sense of Islam and its followers. The need to identify “militant jihadists” by distinguishing them from moderate Muslims has cast suspicion on all Muslims in America. Stereotypes are becoming well-entrenched. The purpose of this documentary is to break those stereotypes by showcasing Pakistani Americans and asking them questions non-Muslim Americans have framed through vox pop interviews. A secondary goal is to educate people about the basic tenets of Islam in order to highlight similarities with the Judeo-Christian tradition.

 

APPROACH

Rather than trying to speak for all Muslims, this personal documentary focuses on the Pakistani American community in Rochester. The film does not contend with Muslim stereotypes by advancing religious postulates, instead it uses the more audience-friendly approach of cultural exploration (including norms and values derived from religion). Islamic scholars are interviewed to answer basic questions about Islamic theology and history, but most issues are commented on by regular Pakistani Americans who want to participate in America’s mainstream socio-political discourse. Filmmaker Mara Ahmed acts as the film’s narrator, taking the audience on a journey into a little-known, but much talked about American community.

 

THEME

The underlying idea is to highlight similarities between Islam and other Abrahamic faiths and to celebrate the cultural richness and diversity brought into the American mix by Muslim communities. The film aims to become a dialogue between Americans who might not otherwise interact. It is also a much needed platform for moderate Muslims to express their views about what’s happening in the world. By being both American and Muslim they have a unique insight into the complex inner workings of American foreign policy and the role of the media.

 

STRUCTURE

The documentary is a montage of several visual and thematic elements:

1) Segments include Interviews with Pakistani American Muslims, Islamic scholars and the Imam at the Islamic Center of Rochester about (1) How things have changed since 9/11 (2) Why are Muslims portrayed a certain way by American media? (3) Islam 101 (4) Is Islam a violent religion? (5) Islam and terrorism (6) What’s jihad? (7) Women in Islam (8) What’s next?

2) Transitions between different segments/topics provide appropriate context for the discussion and some food for thought. Transitions are also used to point out inconsistencies or underline important aspects of the discourse.

3) Vox pop is used to interview non-Muslim Americans and frame some of the questions that are addressed in the film.

4) Vignettes are interspersed throughout the documentary to break up various segments, provide some relief from serious dialogue and show the lives of mainstream American Muslims.

 

AUDIO-VISUAL STYLE

The Muslims I Know addresses serious issues in an edgy, fast-paced, tightly edited, modern format. Interviews are shot handheld, in different locations. Short sections of interviews are intercut with photographs and footage to bring personal histories to life. Footage shot in Lahore, Pakistan, is presented in saturated color to bring out cultural exuberance. It takes the form of an explosive collage that captures the spirit of the city rather than being a real-life representation. The film has an artistic visual feel. Qawali music is used to tie images together into a dynamic montage. There is abundant use of music throughout the film to produce a vibrant, positive outlook. The end result is a documentary which is thought-provoking and attractive. The gravity of its theme combined with the appeal of its format makes it all the more palatable and effective in its reach.

 

DISCUSSION GUIDE

“The Muslims I Know: Discussion Guide for the Film” was written and compiled by Dr. Anthony Cerulli,
Dr. Aitezaz Ahmed and Mara Ahmed. You can download for free by clicking below.

TMIK Discussion Guide

 

PREMIERE

“The Muslims I Know” opened on June 8, 2008 at the Dryden Theatre in Rochester, NY. The event was co-sponsored by Women in Film and Television Rochester. About 300 people attended the screening. The response to the film was enthusiastic and the screening was followed by a robust, hour-long discussion. June Foster, Executive Director, Rochester/Finger Lakes Film and Video Office, introduced Mara Ahmed, the film’s Director, Producer and Writer. Mara spoke briefly about why she made the film and thanked people who had helped with the project, many of whom were in attendance. They included most of the film’s interviewees as well as Thom Marini (Chief Cinematographer), Chuck Munier (Post Production Services), Dave Sluberski (Post Production Sound), Shamoun Murtza (Musical Score), and Teagan Ward (Theme Song). Nora Brown, President of Women in Film and Television Rochester, and Sarita Arden were the main organizers of the event. The post screening discussion was moderated by Barry Goldfarb, Professor, Department of Visual and Performing Arts, Monroe Community College. The panel consisted of Aitezaz, Bilal, Farah, Ibrahim, Dr. Davila, Thom Marini and Mara Ahmed.

 

PEOPLE ARE SAYING

Bruce Acker, Assistant Director, Asian Studies, University at Buffalo

Thank you for showing “The Muslims I Know” at the University at Buffalo. The film does a superb job portraying the aspirations of Pakistani-Americans in the 21st century. Not surprisingly, the subjects of your film have the same goals for peace, freedom, prosperity, and security that other Americans have. Unfortunately, on top of the general post-9/11 anxiety that we all feel, Muslims have faced suspicion and fear that their words and actions will be met with prejudice and misunderstanding. We need to get to know Muslims better – as a group and as individuals among us in our schools, neighborhoods, places of work, and communities.

Eric Comins, International Student & Scholar Services, University at Buffalo

After seeing such negative extremist images in the media, the average non-Muslim U.S. citizen tends to wonder if there is such a thing as a moderate Muslim. “The Muslims I Know” is a realistic portrayal of Muslims who are just like any other American (because they ARE American). They live, love, and laugh just like everybody else. It’s very easy to dislike or fear someone you don’t know. Viewers of this film will be pleasantly surprised to learn just how average and likeable the subjects of the film are. After all, we all came to the US for the same reasons: to make a better life for ourselves and our families and to enjoy an increased sense of freedom.

Linda Moroney, Filmmaker and Technical Director, Rochester High Falls International Film Festival

I very much enjoyed your film and found it to be wonderful. I think your opening was in fact, brilliant! Your narration was strong, personal, and inviting. I hope this project will help people that live their lives based on a platform of fear to see beyond that motivation.

Chris Christopher, Producer and Writer of July ’64, an Emmy-nominated documentary broadcast on PBS’s Independent Lens, Managing Director of ImageWordSound

I saw your film today. I thought it was lovely and thoughtful – a true labor of love. The shots are interesting and dynamic, the speakers articulate and the points well made. I especially liked the answer back format with questions from bystanders. The “A is for Allah, J is for Jihad” section was truly horrifying.

Dr. Greta Niu, Assistant Professor Department of English, University of Rochester

I would like to thank you and all of your participants for creating such an educational, compelling, wonderful film. It made me feel very hopeful, as did much of the subsequent audience discussion. Please tell everyone that I was truly impressed with their words on screen and off. You found some extremely articulate, contemplative, intelligent people! So many questions after the screening were also addressed carefully and smartly. Your husband and you, I thought, especially, responded so thoughtfully and strongly to the question about serving as a “spokesperson for the race/ethnic group”.

Dr. Russell Peck, John Hall Deane Professor of English, University of Rochester

What a wonderful film. We loved every minute of it. it’s so beautiful to see on a large screen. The film’s message came across with superb clarity. You used the younger set magnificently; they were all so articulate and well focused in the points they were making, whether in a light vein or seriously. The discussion afterwads was excellent too. You were both very articulate in fielding questions, even the aggressive ones by the woman at the end. You both certainly gave us plenty to think about. I’m looking forward mightily to the showing at UR in the fall. The remarks from the young woman at the end about using it in Rochester schools was very promising.

Dr. Randy Kaplan, Director, Asian American Studies and Programming, SUNY Geneseo, Artistic Director of GENseng – Geneseo’s Asian American Performance Ensemble

In short, it was wonderful! I thought you did a beautiful job (and you have a great voice, you should have been a performer!) – very touching and straightforward. I loved all of the people in it, and I wished I had been invited to the wedding in Lahore. I think that is exactly what you wanted to accomplish, yes – having people (non-Muslims) watch it and say, “Hey, I wish I knew that family or those students in person!”

Debora McDell-Hernandez, Coordinator of Community Programs and Outreach, Memorial Art Gallery

Congratulations on producing such a wonderful film! I was really impressed. You created a great project in a relatively short period of time too. I applaud the people featured in the documentary for being so candid in their responses to questions. I am glad that you have been able to nurture your artistic side over the last few years.

Kate Green, President, Newcomers’ Club, Pittsford

Just wanted to tell you how pleased I was to see the great turnout for you ‘World Premiere’ today. Your film is magnificent and I am such a supporter of your contribution to world peace and understanding.

 

MORE INFORMATION

“A is for Allah, J is for Jihad” by Craig Davis, the World Policy Journal, Spring 2002

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the Education Center for Afghanistan, located in Peshawar, Pakistan, and operated by the Afghan Mujahideen (holy warriors), published a series of primary education textbooks replete with images of Islamic militancy. These schoolbooks provided the Mujahideen (who, after a ten-year struggle, drove the Soviet occupying forces from Afghanistan in 1989) with a medium for promoting political propaganda and inculcating values of Islamic militancy into a new generation of holy warriors prepared to conduct jihad against the enemies of Islam. More here.

 

“From U.S., the ABC’s of Jihad” by Joe Stephens and David B. Ottaway, the Washington Post, March 23, 2002

In the twilight of the Cold War, the United States spent millions of dollars to supply Afghan schoolchildren with textbooks filled with violent images and militant Islamic teachings, part of covert attempts to spur resistance to the Soviet occupation. More here.

 

Muslim Condemnations of 9/11

In the aftermath of the violence and horror of 9/11, criticisms were made that Muslim leaders and organizations were not outspoken enough in denouncing acts of terrorism. Muslims are constantly perplexed by this accusation, as we heard (and continue to hear) nothing but unequivocal and unified condemnations by the leaders of our community, both in the United States and worldwide. More here.

 

Muslims Condemn Terrorist Attacks

This page focuses on condemnations of the 9/11 terrorist attacks and other terrorist incidents since then as well as of terrorism in general. It is not a complete listing of all condemnations written or spoken by Muslims but is intended to provide a representative sample. More here.

 

These 6 Corporations Control 90% Of The Media In America

This infographic created by Jason at Frugal Dad shows that almost all media comes from the same six sources. That’s consolidated from 50 companies back in 1983. The fact that a few companies own everything demonstrates “the illusion of choice,” Frugal Dad says. While some big sites, like Digg and Reddit aren’t owned by any of the corporations, Time Warner owns news sites read by millions of Americans every year. More here.

 

LIST OF ALTERNATIVE MEDIA

The concentration of corporate media ownership in the US, has made it more important than ever to consult alternative, non-mainstream media in order to be well-informed about what’s going on in America and the world. For a comprehensive list of thought-provoking alternative media, please click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Written, Produced and Directed by
Mara Ahmed

Director of Photography
Thom Marini

Additional Camera
Jae Wilson
Mara Ahmed

Edited by
Mara Ahmed

Original Songs by
Teagan L. Ward

Original Music by
Shamoun Murtza
Matt Giresi

Qawwali Music by
Khalid Saleem

Sound by
Randy Sparrazza

Assistant Editor
Adam Richlin

Post Production Services
Chuck Munier
NXT Media
Fairport, New York

Audio Post Production
David Sluberski
West Rush Productions
Rush, New York

Graphics and Animation
Irina Slastenko

Title Design
Adam Richlin

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    Pakistan One on One

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    A Thin Wall